Books6th Grade
Narrative Texts
 

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Unit Information

Curriculum Map: Narrative Texts/Narrative Writing

Unit Map:  Teacher-Constructed (9/24/12)

Checklist: Narrative Texts/Narrative Writing

List of Novels: Middle School List of Novels
(teachers may use a selection(s) from the attached list to address the standards)

Unit Length:  37 Days

Domains: (select a domain)

Performance Tasks:

  • Halloween Horror Stories - Frankenstein Creative Story Maps
  • "I" Activity - Self Portrait
  • Plot Diagrams - Diagrams of the plot sequence including exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution, etc.)
  • "LaBamba" - Students research their favorite type of music and bring in their findings/favorite recording of that type of music to share with the class
  • Historical Fiction - "The Gold Cadillac" - Short Writing Assignment/How is historical fiction different from nonfiction in structure and tone? Have students compare how they feel when they read historical fiction, such as "The Good Cadillac", to how they feel when they read a history book
  • Comparison-Contrast Essay - Write a comparison-contrast essay that explores the similarities and differences between two literary elements, such as characters, plot, or setting. The purpose of the essay is to inform your audience. This works well with expository writing standards, though not a part of this particular unit. *If you do not wish to complete the entire essay at this point, you might have students to produce a Venn diagram to show these similarities and differences (pp. 106-115)
  • Presenting an Oral Narrative - Students select a story and become a storyteller in front of the class pp. 116-117
  • Comparing Texts - Write a "Do Over" - In two or three paragraphs, describe an incident or decision that you wish you could "do over." How has the incident or decision affected your life? How would you "do over" or fix the situation? What have you learned from it? p. 195
Reading Literary (RL)
CCGPS Unit Standards: (click on a standard to see resources)
ELACC6RL1.a Cite textual evidence to support an analysis of what the text says explicitly (DOK 2/3)
Prerequisites:
  • 5th grade standard: Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly
Essential Questions:
  • How will citing textual evidence lend credibility to analysis of what the text says?
  • How do I find textual evidence to support my analysis?
Key Vocabulary:
textual evidence
credibility
analysis
Resources:
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Introductory Course/Fiction pp. 4-434
  • Holt Teacher Resources: Collection 1 - Short Story/Forms of Fiction
  • Holt Teacher Resources: Collection 2 - Short Story/Plot and Setting
  • Holt Teacher Resources: Collection 3 - Short Story/Character
  • Holt Teacher Resources: Collection 4 - Short Story/Theme
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ELACC6RL1.b Cite textual evidence to support an analysis of inferences drawn from the text (DOK 2/3)
Prerequisites:
  • 5th grade standard: Quote accurately when drawing inferences from a text
Essential Questions:
  • How will citing textual evidence lend credibility to my analysis of inferences drawn from the text?
  • How do I determine inferences drawn from the text?
  • How do inferences affect the meaning of the text?
Key Vocabulary:
textual evidence
credibility
analysis
Resources:
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Introductory Course/Fiction pp. 4-434
  • Holt Teacher Resources: Collection 1 - Short Story/Forms of Fiction
  • Holt Teacher Resources: Collection 2 - Short Story/Plot and Setting
  • Holt Teacher Resources: Collection 3 - Short Story/Character
  • Holt Teacher Resources: Collection 4 - Short Story/Theme

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ELACC6RL2.a Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details (include universal themes) (DOK 3)
Prerequisites:
  • 5th grade standard: Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic
Essential Questions:
  • How is theme determined and conveyed through the details of the story?
  • What is the difference between implied and stated themes and how do I determine each?
  • How is theme different from main idea?
  • What is universal theme in a story?
Key Vocabulary:
theme
main idea
stated theme
Resources:
  • Holt Teacher Resources: Collection 1 - Short Story/Forms of Fiction
  • Holt Teacher Resources: Collection 4 - Short Story/Theme
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Introductory Course - "Short Story Theme"
    pages 344-434
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Re-teaching Lessons - Theme page 859J
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Theme/Subject page 371
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Theme/Plot page 385
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ELACCRL2.b Provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments (DOK 2)
Prerequisites:
  • 5th grade standard: Summarize the text
Essential Questions:
  • Why is it important to provide an accurate summary of the text?
Key Vocabulary:
summary
personal opinion
Resources:
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Reading Focus page 348
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Summary Workshop page 434
  • Holt Elements of Language: Summarizing Texts pages 743-747
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ELACC6RL3.a Describe how a particular story's or drama's plot unfolds in a series of episodes (DOK 2)
Prerequisites:
  • 5th grade standard: Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story, drawing on specific details in the text
Essential Questions:
  • What is a plot sequence?
  • How does plot sequence provide a picture of the story?
Key Vocabulary:
plot
climax
episodes
details
resolution
Resources:
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Introductory Course - Fiction pages 4-434
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Drama pages 742-746
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Media Workshop page 842
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Re-teaching Plot pages 859e, 859f
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Plot/Conflict page 141
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Plot/Setting page 153
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Theme/Plot page 385
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ELACC6RL3.b Describe how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution (characterization) (DOK 2)
Prerequisites:
  • 5th grade standard: Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story, drawing on specific details in the text
Essential Questions:
  • How do characters change as the plot progresses in a story?
  • How does the author use the protagonist vs. antagonist to advance the plot?
Key Vocabulary:
character
characterization
character motivation
antagonist vs. protagonist
Resources:
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Fiction-Short Story Character pages 232-236
  • Holt Elements of Literature: What Reading Skills Help You Understand Character
    page 236
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Literary Skills Review page 334
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Re-teaching Character page 859
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Characterization pages 245, 255
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Character and Conflict pages 271, 281
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ELACC6RL4.a Determine the meaning of words and phrases, including figurative and connotative meanings as they are used in a text (DOK 2)
Prerequisites:
  • 5th grade standard: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes
Essential Questions:
  • How does the reader use contextual evidence to determine meaning of words and phrases?
  • How does the reader use sensory details and figurative language to determine meaning of words and phrases?
Key Vocabulary:
vivid verbs
description
loaded words
connotative meaning
Resources:
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Vocabulary Skills Review pages 122, 226, 338, 450, 569, 636, 734, 856, 859N (fig.) 
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Vocabulary Skills Connections page 252
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Shades of Meaning page 72
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Figurative Language page 245
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Fiction pages 4-434
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Nonfiction pages 458-550 (Informational)
  • SuccessMaker: Reading Extended Learning Time Activities
  • Multi-Cultural Reader: Accelerated Reading
  • Keep on Reading: Level G
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ELACC6RL4.b Analyze the impact of word choice on meaning and tone (DOK 3)
Prerequisites:
  • 5th grade standard: Does not address impact of word choice
Essential Questions:
  • How does an author's choice of words affect his meaning?
  • What are some of the common tone words often found in a passage?
  • How does word choice affect the tone of the passage?
Key Vocabulary:
tone
tone words
dialogue
word choice
overall meaning
Resources:
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Tone Words - Vocabulary Skills Review Shades of Meaning page 72
  • SuccessMaker: Reading Extended Learning Time Activities
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ELACC6RL5.a Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text (i.e. foreshadowing, flashback, poem's structure) (DOK 2)
Prerequisites:
  • 5th grade standard:
Essential Questions:
  • What is the structure of the narrative?
  • How does the structure of the text change the overall effect of the narrative?
  • How does structure affect meaning?
Key Vocabulary:
flashback
foreshadowing
Resources:
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Suspense/Foreshadowing page 789
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Re-teaching Lessons: Plot page 859F
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Theme page 859J
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ELACC6RL5.b Analyze how structure contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot (DOK 3)
Prerequisites:
  • 5th grade standard: Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas
Essential Questions:
  • How does the structure of the passage contribute to theme, setting, or plot?
  • How does structure affect meaning?
Key Vocabulary:
myth
fable
legend
cultural
Resources:
  • Holt Teacher Resources: Collection 1 - Forms of Fiction
  • Holt Teacher Resources: Collection 4 - Theme
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Introductory Course/"Short Story Theme"
    pages 344-434
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Re-teaching Lessons - Theme page 859J
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Theme/Subject page 371
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Theme/Plot page 385
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ELACC6RL6 Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text (i.e. speaker in poetry or the narrator in a drama or story) (DOK 2)
Prerequisites:
  • 5th grade standard: Describe how a narrator's or speaker's point of view influences how events are described
Essential Questions:
  • What is first person point of view?
  • What is third person point of view?
  • How is point of view determined and how is it developed by the author?
Key Vocabulary:
point of view
oral tradition
story telling
first person point of view
Resources:
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Introductory Course/Fiction pages 4-434
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Re-teaching Lessons: Speakers and Narration page 859J
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Autobiography and First Person page 471
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Biography and Third Person page 493
  • Holt Teacher Resources: Collection1 - "Forms of Fiction/Point of View"
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ELACC6RL7 Compare and contrast the experience of reading a story, drama, or poem to listening to or viewing an audio, video, or live version of the text (DOK 2)
Prerequisites:
  • 5th grade standard: Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text
Essential Questions:
  • How is reading a narrative different listening to it being read or watching it on video?
  • Why should a narrative be read aloud or watched on video?
Key Vocabulary:
video
media
fluency
reading aloud
meaning and tone
Resources:
  • Holt Teacher Resources: Audio CD's Visualizing Poetry (comparisons for metaphor); John Henry, The Toaster, Steam Shovel, Sidewalk Racer
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Things to do if you were a Sidewalk pages 713-717
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Analyzing Visuals page 578
  • Novels to consider: The Secret Garden, Tuck Everlasting (compare/contrast video to text)
  • DVD's of stories, poems, or dramas - located in the media center and Holt Teacher Resources (Teachers are reminded to use only those videos that correspond with the text and only those previously viewed. In addition, teachers are to use only parts of the video for comparison with the text)
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ELACC6RL9 Compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres (e.g. stories and poems; historical novels and fantasy stories) in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics (DOK 2)
Prerequisites:
  • 5th grade standard: Compare and contrast stories in the same genre (e.g. mysteries and adventure stories) on their approaches to similar themes and topics
Essential Questions:
  • How do myths, historical novels, and fantasy stories differ?
  • How are theme and topic changed by the story form being used?
  • How does culture influence literature?
Key Vocabulary:
myths
poems
fantasy
folk tale
Resources:
  • Holt Elements of Literature: "The Storytelling Stone" page 10 Folktale
  • Holt Elements of Literature: "He Lion, Bruh Bear, and Bruh Rabbit" Folktale
  • Holt Elements of Literature: "The Fox and the Crow/The Wolf and House Dog" Fables page 54
  • Holt Elements of Literature: "Do or Die from Gilgamesh the Hero" Myth/Epic page 60
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ELACC6RL10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range (DOK 2)
Prerequisites:
  • 5th grade standard: By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems at the high end of the grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently
Essential Questions:
  • How will reading a variety of narrative texts (novels, short stories, poetry, and drama) affect my reading comprehension skills?
  • How will reading a variety of narrative texts make me more knowledgeable?
  • How can I become an independent reader?
Key Vocabulary:
novel
drama
short story
narrative texts
independent reader
Resources:
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Introductory Course/Fiction pages 4-434
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Nonfiction pages 458-550
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Persuasive Texts and Media pages 576-622
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Elements of Poetry pages 644-720
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Elements of Drama pages 742-842
  • SuccessMaker: Reading Extended Learning Time Activities
  • Multi-Cultural Reader: Accelerated Reading
  • Keep on Reading: Level G
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Narrative Writing (W)
Writing Resources:
CCGPS Unit Standards: (click on a standard to see resources)
ELACC6W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured events (DOK 3)
Prerequisites:
  • 5th grade standard: same (except leaves out "relevant" and "structured" instead says "clear event sequences"
Essential Questions:
  • How do I write a narrative using descriptive details and well-structured organization?
Key Vocabulary:
narrative style
narrative technique
Resources:
  • Holt Elements of Language: Descriptive Essay page 720
  • Holt Elements of Language: Writing Workshop-Writing a Descriptive Essay page 729
  • Holt Elements of Language: Writing Workshop - Short Story page 210
  • Holt Elements of Language: Writing a Short Story page 628
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ELACC6W3.a Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator and/or characters (DOK 3)
Prerequisites:
  • 5th grade standard: Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters
Essential Questions:
  • How do I engage the reader and introduce a narrator or characters in my story?
Key Vocabulary:
engaging the reader
Resources:
  • Holt Elements of Language: Writing Workshop - A Life Experience pages 479-491
  • Holt Elements of Language: Writing a Narrative Poem page 494
  • Holt Elements of Language: Reading Workshop - An Autobiographical Incident
    page 470
  • Holt Elements of Language: Narrative Paragraphs
  • Holt Elements of Language: Writing a Narrative Paragraph page 462
  • "The Hook" - Powerpoint from Jefferson County Schools
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ELACC6W3.a.1 Organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically (DOK 3)
Prerequisites:
  • 5th grade standard: the same as the 6th grade standard except it leaves out the word "logically"
Essential Questions:
  • What are some of the major organizational skills I need to write successful narratives?
Key Vocabulary:
organization
event sequence
Resources:
  • Holt Elements of Language: "What is a Paragraph?" pages 444-455
  • Holt Elements of Language: "What Makes a Good Paragraph?" - Organizing ideas, Spatial order, Chronological order, etc. pages 444-455
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ELACC6W3.b Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or character (DOK 3)
Prerequisites:
  • 5th grade standard: Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic
Essential Questions:
  • How do I write dialogue into my story?
  • How do narrative techniques such as dialogue, pacing, and description affect the development of experiences, events, and/or character?
Key Vocabulary:
context
pacing
narrator
plot sequencing
characterization
Resources:
  • Elements of Language: Writing Workshop "Short Story" page 222
  • Elements of Language: Critical Thinking Mini Lesson: Arranging Ideas page 479
  • Narrative Writing http://jc-schools.net/PPTs-la.html
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ELACC6W3.c Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts of setting and time (DOK 3)
Prerequisites:
  • 5th grade standard: Link ideas within and across categories of information using words, phrases, clauses (e.g., contrast, especially)
Essential Questions:
  • What are the most commonly used transitional words to advance the plot?
Key Vocabulary:
transition words
signal shifts (setting, time)
Resources:
  • Transitional Words page 555
  • Mini Lesson - "Writing Instructions" page 560
  • Conclusion - "The Clincher Sentence" page 448
  • Holt Writing Notes DVD - "Process and Strategies for Effective Writing"
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ELACC6W3.d Use precise words, phrases, relevant details, and sensory language (DOK 3)
Prerequisites:
  • 5th grade standard: Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic
Essential Questions:
  • How do I make my words and phrasing more precise?
  • How does the use of sensory language help my narrative?
Key Vocabulary:
style
precise words
relevant details
sensory language
Resources:
  • Holt Elements of Language: Writing Workshops - Writing Descriptively
    pages 720, 729
  • Holt Language Handbook Worksheets: "Using Connecting Words to Combine Sentences" page 96
  • Holt Elements of Literature: Definitions/Examples pages 647, 704, 721
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ELACC6W3.e Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated event and experiences (DOK 3)
Prerequisites:
  • 5th grade standard: Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation
Essential Questions:
  • How do I write a conclusion that follows the events and experiences of the story?
  • How do I revise, rewrite, and edit my writing?
Key Vocabulary:
conclusion
resolution
Resources:
  • Providing a Solid Conclusion - powerpoint from Jefferson County Schools http://jc-schools.net/PPTs-la.html
  • 6 + 1 Writing Traits - Ideas, Organization, Style, etc. "Providing Dynamic Conclusions"
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ELACCELACC6W4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience (grade-specific) (DOK 3)
Prerequisites:
  • 5th grade standard: does not address the "style" of an essay
Essential Questions:
  • Why is clearness and coherence important to writing?
  • How do development, organization, and style affect my purpose?
Key Vocabulary:
style
task
purpose
audience
development
organization
Resources:
  • Holt Elements of Language: pages 444-455 "What is a paragraph?" "What Makes a Good Paragraph?" Organizing ideas, Spatial Order, Chronological order, etc.
  • Holt Elements of Language: Chapter 18 - "Sharing Our Stories"
  • 6 + 1 Writing Traits - Ideas, Organization, Style, etc.
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ELACCELACC6W5 With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach (DOK 3)
Prerequisites:
  • 5th grade standard: writes from the same set of standards of narrative writing, with the exception of phrases such as "relevant" details, "well-structured" events, "engage", use transitions to "signal shifts" in time, and use "precise" words (using concrete words instead)
Essential Questions:
  • How do I revise, rewrite, and edit my writing?
  • How do planning, revising, editing, and rewriting strengthen the overall presentation of my writing?
Key Vocabulary:
editing
revising
rewriting
peer editing
Narrative Writing/Storytelling
plot sequence
description/details
emphasis on IDEAS
Writing to Win: Short Descriptions
characters
setting
Resources:
  • Holt Elements of Language: Chapter 1 Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics
    pages 46-390
  • Holt Elements of Language: Chapter 2 Sentences and Paragraphs pages 426-444
  • Holt Language Handbook Worksheets: pages 83-100
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