English Language Arts8th Grade ELA
Unit 3/Argumentation
Persuasive Writing

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Unit Information

Curriculum Map:  Argumentation / Persuasion

Unit Map:  Argumentation / Persuasion -  (Teacher-Constructed)

Checklist: Checklist

Unit Length: 25 days

Resources by Concept: (click on a concept)

Prerequisites  |  Reading Informational Standards  |  Writing Standards

CCGPS Unit Standards:

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Reading Informational (RI) - ELACC7RI1-2; ELACC7RI4-10
Depth of Knowledge (Parentheses)

  • ELACC8RI1.a - Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says. (2)

  • ELACC8RI1.b - Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis what inferences drawn from the text (2)

  • ELACC8RI2.a - Determine a central ideas of a text.

  • ELACC8RI2.b - Analyze the development of a central idea over the course of a text, including its relationship to supporting ideas. (3)

  • ELACC8RI2.c - Provide an objective summary of the text. (2)

  • ELACC8RI4.a - Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings. (2)

  • ELACC8RI4.b - Analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. (3)

  • ELACC8RI5.a - Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text. (2)

  • ELACC8RI5.b - Include in the analysis the role particular sentences play in the development and refinement of key concepts.

  • ELACC8RI6.a - Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text. (2)

  • ELACC8RI6.b - Analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints.

  • ELACC8RI7 - Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea. (2)

  • ELACC8RI8.a - Evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text. (2)

  • ELACC8RI8.b - Assess whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced. (2) ( i.e, Wikipedia vs. Encyclopedia: Search sites such as Google - How authentic are they?  Are they primary sources? Etc.)

  • ELACC8RI9 - Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation. (3)

  • ELACC8RI10 - By the end of the year read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades
     6-8 complexity band independently and proficiently (2/3)

    Argumentation / Persuasive Writing  - ELACC8W1a-f

  • ELACC8W1- Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence (3)

  • ELACC8W1.a -Introduce claim(s) acknowledge and distinguish the claims from alternate or opposing claims(3)

  • ELACC8W1.a - Introduce a topic clearly previewing what is to follow. (3)

  • ELACC8W1.a.1-Organize the reasons and evidence logically. (3)

  • ELACC8W1.b - Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant evidence. (3)

  • ELACC8W1.b.1 - Use accurate, credible sources and demonstrate an understanding of the topic and text. (3)

  • ELACC8W1.c - Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.(3)

  • ELACC8W1.d - Establish and maintain a formal style. (3)

  • ELACC8W1.e - Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. (3)

    Production of Writing - ELACC8W4-6

  • ELACC8W4 - Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purposes, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3) (3)

  • ELACC8W9 - Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

  • ELACC8W10 - Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences. (3)

    Speaking and Listening - ELACC8SL2

  • ELACC8SL2 - Analyze the purpose of information presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and evaluate the motives (e.g., social, commercial, political) behind its presentation (2)

  • ELACC8SL3 - Delineate a speaker's argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and relevance and sufficiency of the evidence and identifying when irrelevant evidence is introduced. (2)

  • ELACC8SL4 - Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with relevant evidence, sound valid reasoning, and well-chosen details (3)

  • ELACCSL4.a - Use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation (3)

  • ELACC8SL5 - Integrate multimedia and visual displays into presentations to clarify information, strengthen claims and evidence, and add interest (3)

Prerequisites: Based on 7th grade standard

    • ELACC7RI1.a - Cite textual evidence to support what the text says explicitly. (3)

    • ELACC7RI1.b - Cite textual evidence to support inferences drawn from the text. (3)

    • ELACC7RI2.a - Determine two or more central ideas in a text. (2)

    • ELACC7RI2.b - Analyze the development of central ideas in a text. (2)

    • ELACC7RI2.c - Provide an objective summary of the text (Verbally or in writing) (3)

    • ELACC7RI3 - Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text. (2/3)

    • ELACC7RI4.a - Determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text, including connotative, figurative, and technical meanings. (2)

    • ELACC7RI4.b - Analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone. (2)

    • ELACC7RI5 - Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas. (3)

    • ELACC7RI6.a - Explain an author's point of view or purpose in a text (2)

    • ELACC7RI6.b - Analyze how the author distinguishes his or her opinion from that of others (3)

    • ELACC7RI7 - Compare and contrast a text to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing each medium's portrayal of the subject (e.g., how the delivery of a speech affects the impact of the words) (2)

    • ELACC7RI8 - Trace and Evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims. (3)

    • ELACC7RI9 - Analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their presentations of key information by emphasizing the different evidence or advancing different interpretations of facts. (3)

    • ELACC7RI10 - By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6-8 complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. (2/3)

      Argumentation / Persuasive Writing - (W) - ELACC7W1a-e

    • ELACC7W1 - Same as 8th Grade (3)

    • ELACC7W1.a - Same (except does not say "distinguish" on 7th Grade. (3)

    • ELACC7W1.a.1 - Same as 8th grade(3)

    • ELACC7W1b - Same as 8th grade. (3

    • ELACC7W1.b.1- Same as 8th grade (3)

    • ELACC7W1.c - Same as 8th grade (3)

    • ELACC7W1.d - Same as 8th grade(3)

    • ELACC7W1.e - Same as 8th grade. (3)

      Production of Writing (W) - ELACC7W4-6

    • ELACC7W4 - Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above) (3)

    • ELACC7W5 - With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed. (3)

    • ELACC7W7 - Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions for further research and investigation. (3)

    • ELACC7W8.a - Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively.

    • ELACC7W8.b - Assess the credibility and accuracy of each source. (3)

    • ELACC7W8.c - Quote or paraphrase the data and conclusion of othes, while avoiding plagiarism. (3)

    • ELACC7W8.d - Follow a standard format for citation (3)

    • ELACC7W9 - Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, & research. (3

      Speaking and Listening - ELACC7SL1-6  - Same as 8th Grade

     

Concept 1:  Elements of Argumentative Texts ELA8RI1-2; 4-10
ELACC8RI1.a - Textual Evidence (DOK 2)
ELACC8RI1.b- Inferences (DOK 2)
ELACC8RI2 -   Central Idea (DOK 2/3)
ELACC8RI4 -   Word Choices (DOK 2/3)
ELACC8RI5 -   Structure of Paragraphs (DOK 2/3)
ELACC8RI6 -   Author's Purpose and Point of View (DOK 2/3)
ELACC8RI7 -   Various Media (DOK 2)
ELACC8RI8.a - Evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text. (DOK 2)
ELACC8RI8.b - Assess Reasoning and Evidence. (DOK 2)
ELACC7RI9 -   Conflicting Textual Information (DOK 3)
ELACC8RI10 - Reading and Comprehension (DOK 2)
Student Essential Questions:
How does the choice of textual evidence affect the credibility of analysis of what the text says?
How do facts, details, and ideas lend support to argumentation?

Teacher-Guided Instruction - Questions
*These questions are intended to guide teacher instruction.  The student EQ is provided to post and reference during the lesson.
  • Why is it important to support my analysis of persuasive information with textual evidence?
  • How will I choose the strongest textual evidence to support my analysis of the persuasive text?
  • How does the choice of textual evidence affect the credibility of my analysis of what the text says?
  • How can my choice of textual evidence affect the analysis of the inferences I draw from the text?
  • How can my choice of textual evidence persuade my reader?
  • How do I determine the central idea of a persuasive text?
  • How do facts, details, and ideas lend support to persuasion or argumentation?
  • How does a reader use context clues, figurative language, and technical meanings to understand the meaning of words and phrases in a text?
  • How does a writer's word choice affect meaning and tone and ultimately his argument?
  • How does an author use the structure of a paragraph and persuasive techniques to persuade?
  • How can allusions/analogies help an author persuade or argue?
  • How do sentences and organizational structure play a role in the development of key ideas that will persuade the reader?
  • How can an author's point of view or perspective affect his ability to argue or persuade?
  • How does an author effectively counter-argue or confront conflicting evidence?
  • How does an author choose the best form or medium to use when attempting to argue or persuade?
  • How does the use of multimedia affect an author's presentation?
  • Why is it important to evaluate claims and arguments made by the author?
  • How do I become a more proficient reader?
  • How is an author's presentation of information affected by his own interpretation?
  • Why is it important to read several texts providing similar or conflicting facts or interpretation?
  • How do sound reasoning, relevance, and sufficient evidence lend credibility to an author's claims?
  • How does reading all types of nonfiction and informational texts make me a more proficient reader?
Key Vocabulary: *Review term taught in a previous unit
journalism vs. opinion unity
coherence credibility*
textual features* false reasoning
author's message author's perspective
conflicting viewpoints validity
persuasion propaganda
stereotyping false information
counterarguments order of importance
conflicting evidence* bias* / logic
Resources:
  • Elements of Literature (Holt) - Informational Text Focus - Pages 532-544 ; Making Assertions - pp. 578, 596
    Making Predictions - pp. 259, 262, 297, 302; Evaluating Evidence - p. 602; Recognizing Types of Evidence - 602;
    Contextual Page - 417, 424; Clues - pp. 297, 304, 478, 664; Word p. 267; Negative, Neutral, Positive - p. 72; Informational Skills Review - pp. 120, 224, 336, 448, 533, 567, 578, 596, 602, 634, 854; Structures: Chronological Order and Cause and Effect - pp. 826-827, 834; Relative to Persuasion / Argumentation - pp. 576-577;
    Vocabulary Reviews - pp. 123, 226, 338, 450, 569, 734, 856; Handbook of Reading and Informational Terms - 872; Figures of Speech - Analogies 402; Multiple-Meaning Words - pp. 61, 72, 255, 268, 607, 691, 711; Contextual Clues p. 268; How can a Visual Image Suggest Point of View - p. 460
  • Elements of Literature (Holt) - Allusions - pp. 389, 401; Structure of a Newspaper - 95; Structure of a Magazine - p. 89; Structure of a Website - 101; Author's Purpose - 463; Evaluating Arguments - 578; Objective Treatment - 221, 950; Effective Facts / Examples - 565; Audio Collections from Holt: Persuasive Images in the Media 1018-1019; Handbook for Reading and Informational Texts - 998-989 (fact, fallacious reasoning, name-calling, stereotyping, generalization, either/or fallacy, false cause and effect); Advertisement-That Really Works - 611; Compare Persuasion and Propaganda - 606; Decide if Persuasion is Convincing - 580; Comparison and Contrast in Nonfiction - 492; Questions for Evaluating Media Images - 1020 (excellent source); Informational Texts Reviews (Each Unit); newspapers, magazines, editorial pages, persuasive cartoons, advertisement, multimedia proposition and support - 564
  • Elements of Language - Logical Appeals / emotional appeals - 718; Reading and Book Review-Point of View - 606-610; "Sharing an Opinion" - Persuasive Essay - Organization: Focus on Sentences to Vary Meaning (Revision) - p. 739 / Chapter 25
  • Holt Teacher Resources - Collection 5 - Nonfiction Structures; Collection 6 - Persuasive Texts and Media
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Concept 2: Argumentative Writing - ELACC8W1; ELACC8W4-6  (DOK 3)
ELACC8W1 - Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (DOK 3)
ELACC8W1.a - Introduce claim(s); acknowledge & distinguish the claims from alternate/opposing claims. (DOK 3)
ELACC8W1.a.1 - Organize the reasons and evidence logically. (DOK 3)
ELACC8W1.b - Support claims(s) with logical reasoning and relevant evidence. (DOK 3)
ELACC8W1.b.1 - Use accurate, credible sources and demonstrate an understanding of the topic and text. (DOK 3)
ELACC8W1.c - Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s)
ELACC8W1.d - Establish and maintain a formal style. (DOK 3)
ELACC8W1.e - Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports (DOK 3)
ELACC8W4 - Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience  (DOK 3)
ELACC8W5 - With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed. (Revising and editing). (DOK 3)
ELACC8W9 - Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research (3)
Student Essential Questions:
          How do I use the knowledge of argumentative texts to impact and guide my writing?
          How do I effectively organize my arguments and counterarguments to persuade my audience?

Teacher-Guided Instruction Questions:
  • How do I effectively argue in order to persuade?
  • How do I support my argument with clear reasons and relevant evidence?
  • How do I effectively introduce my claims distinguishing them from alternate or opposing claims?
  • How do I effectively organize my reasons and evidence to persuade my audience?
  • Why is logical reasoning and relevant evidence important to lend support to my claims and lend credibility  to my argument?
  • Why are accurate, credible sources so important to a persuasive text?
  • How do I clarify the relationships among claims, counterclaims, reasons, and evidence to create cohesion an provide stronger argument?
  • Why is formal style essential to strong argumentation?
  • How do I provide a concluding statement that supports the argument presented?

     Performance Tasks   
              
Argumentative Reading Project
               Commercials / Advertisements - Create a project that will persuade someone to buy what you are selling.
               (Present these in a video or poster)  DOK 2/3

     Key Vocabulary:  *(Review term taught in a previous unit)
argumentation proposition position statement
counter-argue logical appeal emotional appeal
logical reasoning irrelevant information consistency
call to action    
Resources:
  • Elements of Literature - Writing Workshop / Persuasive Writing - p. 574; Timed Writing / Persuasive - 583;
    Proposition and Support - 565; Essay and Logic - 535; Persuasive Images in Media Page - 1018; Presenting a Persuasive Speech - 584; Author's Technique - 379
  • Elements of Language - Chapter 25 - "Sharing an Opinion" 717; Writing a Short Story that Persuades - p. 745; "Giving and Listening to a Persuasive Speech - p. 747; Logical Appeals and Emotional Appeals - 718; Framework for a Persuasive Essay - pp. 726-737; Giving and Listening to an Informative Speech - 964; Persuasive Images in Media - p. 1018; Literary Perspectives (Analyzing Credibility in Literature - p. 55; Writing Workshop - Persuasive Writing - pp. 574-583 (Include process and rubric)
  • Writing to Win - Either/or Strategy C; Focused-Free Writing Strategy
  • TCSS Writing Prompts - November / Persuasive and Mock Writing - December
  • Test-Taking Mini-Writing a Position Paper - p. 744
  • "Writing Effective Sentences" - Language Handbook - pp. 107-123
  • Elements of Language - Mini Lesson - Persuasive Example and Persuasive Paragraph Devices - pp. 719
  • Elements of Language - Persuasive Paragraphs and Writing a Persuasive Paragraph - pp. 522-525

  Performance Tasks : Troup County Writing Prompt (Argumentative / Persuasion Paper - November) / December

 

Concept 3:  Public Speaking / Oral Presentation Skills - ELACC8SL2-5
ELACC8SL2 - Analyze the purpose of information presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and evaluate the motives (e.g., social, commercial, political) behind its presentation (2)
ELACC8SL3 - Delineate a speaker's argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and relevance and sufficiency of the evidence and identifying when irrelevant evidence is introduced. (DOK 2)
ELACC8SL4.a - Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with relevant evidence, sound valid reasoning, and well-chosen details. (DOK 3)
ELACC8SL4.b - Use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation . (DOK 3)
ELACC8SL5 - Integrate multimedia and visual displays into presentations to clarify information, strengthen claims and evidence, and add interest. (DOK 3)
Student Essential Question:
How do I recognize and evaluate a speaker's motives and incorporate those ideas into my own presentation?

Teacher-Guided Questions
  • How do I recognize and analyze the purpose behind a speaker's claims and presentation?
  • How do I evaluate the motives behind commercials and other types of persuasion in the media?
  • How does a speaker's argument become stronger by using sound reasoning and relevant evidence?
  • Why is it important for a speaker to show enough evidence to support his claims?
  • How are a speaker's arguments made stronger by the use of valid points and well-chosen details?
  • How can appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation make a speaker's presentation more effective?
  • How does the use of multimedia and visual display help to clarify information, strengthen claims and evidence, and add interest to most presentations?
    Key Vocabulary:
motives volume gestures
oral fluency eye contact pronunciation
oral presentation audience  
Resources:
  • Elements of Literature - Giving and Listening to an Informative Speech - 964; Literary Perspective Analyzing Author's Techniques - 379; Listening and Speaking Workshops: Interviewing - 658; Listening and Speaking Workshop: Giving and Listening to an Informative Speech - 964; Listening and Speaking Workshops: Presenting a Response to Literature - 354; Literary Perspective Evaluating: Persuasive Images in Media - 1018; Listening and Speaking Workshops: Giving a Speech of Introduction - 240; Presenting Oral Narratives - 136; Presenting a Persuasive Speech - 584; Presenting and Responding to an Instructional Speech - p. 472
  • Elements of Language - Evaluating Media in Speeches - 831; Quick Reference Handbook - Charts, Timelines etc. - 876-879; Quick Reference Handbook: Identifying Purpose - 828-829; Quick Reference Handbook - Delivery of Formal Speech (Includes eye contact, facial expression, gestures, volume) - p. 831-832.
  • Media Handbook - EOL - Creating Graphics for Technical Documents - 876-879

    Performance Tasks:
    Optimist Oratorical Contest (required for Gifted)
    Campaign Speech
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Concept 4:  Language - ELACC8L1-3
ELACC8L1 - Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing and speaking. (DOK 3)
ELACC8L1.a - Explain the functions of verbal (gerunds, participles, infinitives) in general and their function in particular sentences.  (DOK 2)
ELACC8L1.b - Form and use verbs in active and passive voice. (DOK 2)
ELACC8L1.c - Form and use verbs in the indicative, imperative, interrogative, conditional, and subjunctive mood.
ELACC8L1.d - Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb voice and mood. (DOK 2)
ELACC8L2 - Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, pronunciation, and spelling when writing. (DOK 2)
ELACC8L2.a - Use punctuation (comma, ellipsis, dash) to indicate a pause or break. (DOK 2)
ELACC8L2.b - Use an ellipsis to indicate an omission. (DOK 2)
ELACC8L2.c - Spell Correctly (DOK 2)
ELACC8L3.a - Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. (2)
Standard Essential Questions:
How do I demonstrate a command of sentence combination and use of commas and semicolons in those combinations?

Teacher-Guided Instruction Questions:  (
No specific questions for this section)
  Key Vocabulary: *Prior Terminology
    
comma semicolon transitions*
punctuating a clause sentence combination  
Resources:
  • Elements of Language - Sentence Combining - 485-492; Punctuation: Commas - 359-372; Punctuation: Semicolon - pp. 375-377; Transitional Words and Phrases - pp. 515-516, 546, 604, 618, 696, 878
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